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Employee Switching

naveen_kumar29091984
Participant
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Hi Folks,

How often can employee switch to other organization, in order to make his/her resume looks well?

Regards,

NK

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Jelena
Active Contributor
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Your skills and the way your resume is written make it "look well" (whatever that means), not the number of years spent with a company.

Long time ago there used to be a belief that if you changed the jobs too much it looked suspicious. E.g. such person could be disloyal, have bad temper and what's not. But these days of "sat at the same desk for 3 years and worked for 3 different companies" this is no longer a concern. In IT it's actually almost reverse now - frequent job changes can be an indicator of the skill diversity and adaptability.

I don't believe these days anyone is seriously considering N years to be "good" or "bad".

7 REPLIES 7

VeselinaPeykova
Active Contributor
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Why do you think that simply changing companies will make your resume look better?

The motivation behind switching jobs matters a lot to people who read your CV.

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Thanks for the reply.

Just wanted to understand from HR point of view, is there any specific criteria, that employee should not leave the organization?

What is the maximum and minimum no of years should employee serve in organization from HR prospective?

Regards,

NK

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From what I know, no such criteria exists in any company, unless you have signed a specific contract that requires you to work for a predefined time there (e.g. in some companies they sponsor your university education and in exchange you sign a contract to work for several years in the company, otherwise you pay back a substantial amount).

In my country no one can force you to stay in a company if you don't want to, but there is usually a notice period between 1 and 3 months.

How many years you work in an organization depends on the company, country, market, your plans for the future etc.

People will ask you why you switched positions or employers, so be prepared with a good and honest answer.

Some employers consider brand loyalty as an important criteria, so you need to give them a good reason to consider your application.

I am not working as an HR specialist and most likely we come from different countries, so it can be different in your case.

MTerence
Active Contributor
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Hi Naveen,

Normally 2-3 years is a must in every company you swift

Also after you attain more than 8-10 years, you need to stick to one company for 5-6 years or more to get a good position.

This is my personal opinion, btw i am not a HR

Regards

Terence

Jelena
Active Contributor
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Your skills and the way your resume is written make it "look well" (whatever that means), not the number of years spent with a company.

Long time ago there used to be a belief that if you changed the jobs too much it looked suspicious. E.g. such person could be disloyal, have bad temper and what's not. But these days of "sat at the same desk for 3 years and worked for 3 different companies" this is no longer a concern. In IT it's actually almost reverse now - frequent job changes can be an indicator of the skill diversity and adaptability.

I don't believe these days anyone is seriously considering N years to be "good" or "bad".

0 Kudos

In IT it's actually almost reverse now - frequent job changes can be an indicator of the skill diversity and adaptability.

Unfortunately this is still country- and company-specific.

In all cases, it is best not to base your career decisions on such arbitrary terms - if you are happy with the challenges and opportunities your current position offers - stay, if not - move on.

Even if your application ends on the desk of somebody, who thinks switching jobs often is bad, it's better to be transparent on your motives and save yourself a future frustration.

People are going to run background checks anyway, so they will probably know why you changed companies or positions and how you left the place.

Jelena
Active Contributor
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Veselina Peykova wrote:

Unfortunately this is still country- and company-specific.

I agree. It can also differ for the consultants / "permies". There is not a single guideline, so yes - doesn't make a lot of sense to make the career choices based on something someone might think.

As long as you don't break the law or leave a company with a huge scandal your work history should be fine.