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Trond
Advisor
Advisor
Co-author: waldemar.kramer

This blog will take you through several common supply chain scenarios and explain the roles and responsibilities of Intrastat-reporting for each.




For a basic introduction to Intrastat, please look at this blog.
At the end of this blog is a list of abbreviations used in many of the illustrations.

The Basic Scenarios


We will begin by looking at a typical Intrastat scenario where the buyer and seller are in different EU member states.


In the scenario above, the seller in Country A will report the dispatch (in Country A).
The buyer in Country B will report the Arrival (in Country B).

During the processing of the credit memos, it is decisive whether the credit memo is a credit memo with a goods movement (= return: the Customer sends the goods back entirely or partially) or a credit memo without a goods movement (e.g., the goods arrive damaged and are immediately discarded or a part of the goods is lost underway).

Let us first look at an example with a physical return.


In the example above of a physical return, it is the customer's responsibility to report the dispatch (in country B) and Company A (the original seller) to report the Arrival (in country A).

The document flow looks slightly different in an example with a credit or debit memo with no physical return, but the Intrastat roles remain the same.


Credit and Debit memos always need a reference invoice because otherwise, the system won't report them.

If the credit memo is reported in the same month as the original invoice (F2), G2 is subtracted from F2.

If the original invoice (F2) was reported in an earlier month, a correction report is required.

In a scenario where the original invoice is canceled, we have the following situation:


If cancellation takes place in the same month as the original invoice (F2),  then nothing is reported

If the original invoice (F2) was reported in an earlier month, a correction report is required.

We will now look at how these roles and responsibilities are handled in six additional and different scenarios;

1. Intercompany Sales


What is an intercompany sales scenario?

A sales organization assigned to company code (e.g., XYZ Germany) sells goods to a customer. The goods, however, are delivered from a plant that belongs to company code (e.g., subsidiary XYZ Austria). The sales order (OR) and the invoice to the Customer (F2) are issued by A, and the delivery (LF) is issued by B. Since B wants money for the delivered goods, B issues an intercompany invoice (IV) to A.

How to recognize an intercompany scenario?


Intercompany invoices can be identified by VBRK-VBTYP = '5' (Intercompany Invoice) or '6' (Intercompany Credit Memo). Unfortunately, there is no indicator either in the sales order or in the invoice which would indicate at first sight that the document belongs to a cross-company scenario. However, there are clues, e.g., if, in the document flow, there is an F2 and also an IV. In a cross-company case, the company code of the sales organization is not identical to the company code of the delivering plant.

Let us look at some examples:

Selling Company and Customer in the same country.


Suppose the seller (Company A) and the Customer are located in the same country, and the goods are shipped from Company B in another member state. In that case, Company B will be the one that reports Dispatch (in Country B), and Company A (and not the Customer) will be the one that reports Arrival (in Country B).

In case of a return, the roles are switched. The Customer is still not involved in the reporting. Company A reports dispatch, and Company B reports Arrival in their respective countries.

Selling and Delivering Company in the same Country

Let us see what happens if both the selling company (Company A) and the delivering company (Company B) are located in the same country, and the Customer is located in another country (Country B).


In this case, Company A reports dispatch (in Country A), and the Customer in Country B will be responsible for reporting Arrival there. In case of a physical return, the roles are switched. Company B is passive in this scenario.


Delivering Company and Customer in the same country


What happens if the selling company in Country A sells to a customer in Country B, and the fulfillment is done by a company in the same country as the Customer?


Nothing will be reported in this case since the goods do not cross borders.

Triangulation

What if all involved parties are located in different countries? Company A, in Country A, sells to a customer in Country B. The delivery, however, is done by Company B, located in Country C.


Company B will report dispatch in Country C, and the Customer will report Arrival in Country B.

 

2. Sales Processing using Third-Party (a.k.a Third-Party Sales)


What is Sales Processing using Third-Party?

A sales organization assigned to company code A (e.g., XYZ Germany) sells goods to a customer. However, the goods are delivered not by the company XYZ itself, but instead, an external supplier is contracted to deliver directly to the Customer. At the sales order creation, in the background, a purchase requirement and then from this, a purchase order (PO) is generated. Finally, the external supplier issues a supplier invoice ("Incoming Invoice") to company XYZ.

As company XYZ is not delivering the goods, no delivery is created there. Instead, the billing is done with reference to the sales order to the Customer (billing type F5).

How to recognize a third-party sales scenario?

In standard, the item category TAS is used for third-party items. The billing relevance of the order item is = F ("Order-related billing doc. - status according to invoice quantity").

Selling Company and Customer in the same Country

Let us see what happens when the Selling Company (Company A) and the Customer are located in the same country (Country A) and the delivery is fulfilled by an external supplier in Country B.


In such a scenario, our External Supplier is responsible for reporting dispatch (in Country B), and Company A is accountable for Arrival in Country A. In the case of a return, the roles are simply switched.

Selling Company and External Supplier in the same Country

Let us see what happens when the Selling Company (Company A) and the external supplier are located in the same country (Country A), and the Customer is in Country B.


External Supplier and Customer in the Same Country

What happens if you sell to a customer in another country, but the fulfillment takes place in the Customer's home country?


There is no cross-border goods movement in this case, so no Intrastat reporting is needed. However, the scenario where the external supplier is in a different country than the selling company is currently not supported.

For delivery, the system currently reports the dispatch for company A in country A, which is incorrect.

For the return, the system currently reports Arrival for company A in country A, which is also incorrect.

System behavior can, however, be changed in the BAdI
BADI_INTRASTAT_SELECTION in S/4HANA OP and S/4HANA Private Cloud

Three Different Countries - Triangulation

What if the Selling Company, the Customer, and the External Supplier are in 3 different member states?


Also, here, our role as a selling company is rather passive regarding Intrastat reporting. The External Supplier must report dispatch in Country C, while the Customer must do Arrival reporting in Country B. SAP does currently not support this scenario. Instead:

For delivery, the system currently reports the dispatch for company A in country A, which is incorrect.

For the return, the system currently reports Arrival for company A in country A, which is also incorrect.

System behavior can, however, be changed in the BAdI
BADI_INTRASTAT_SELECTION in S/4HANA OP and S/4HANA Private Cloud


3. Stock Transfer


What is Stock Transfer?

A stock transfer is the shipment of goods from one plant to another within the same concern. We differentiate between intracompany (where plants belong to the same company code) and intercompany (where plants belong to different company codes) stock transfers.

Intracompany Stock Transfer

We will begin by looking at intracompany stock transfer.

It is also known as a replenishment delivery. The order type used is Stock Transfer (order type 'UB').

As the goods remain with the company and only their location is changed, no exchange of money is involved in the process, so there is nothing to bill. The PO history contains only GI and GR.

For internal stock transfers, the following uniqueness exists: the reporting is based not on the goods receipts (invoice receipts do not exist anyway) but on the goods issues instead. The reported values are taken from the good issue documents.

Intracompany stock transfers can be carried out in two different ways: the 1-step process, which consists of a PO and a GI (the GR happens automatically in the background), is unsuitable for Intrastat reporting. For that, the 2-step process must be used.


Company A reports dispatch in Country A and Arrival in Country B.

In the SAP S/4HANA Public edition, the dispatch and the receipt are reported based on RITA tax documents. RITA tax documents are created with reference to the material documents representing intracompany goods movements in intracompany stock transfer.

Intercompany Stock Transfer

The order type used for cross-company stock transfer is standard PO (order type 'NB').

Not only the location but also the ownership of the goods is changed. The delivering company code sends the receiving company code an invoice for the delivered goods. Thus the PO history contains not only a GI and a GR but also an IR.




In this scenario, Company B reports dispatch in Country B, and Company A reports Arrival in Country A.

4. Sub-contracting


What is Sub-contracting?

Subcontracting is the shipment of materials to an external company for further processing. After the processing, the materials are returned as finished goods (final product).

The company that processes the materials is called the subcontractor. The materials sent to the subcontractor are called subcontracting components. The delivery of the components to the subcontractor is called the provision. Therefore, the materials are also called components/materials provided (for subcontracting).

How to recognize a subcontracting PO?

From the item category in the PO item: EKPO-PSTYP = 'L.'

Specialties in the document flow:

At the posting of the GR of the finished (processed) materials, the consumption of the components is also posted automatically. This is recorded in the document flow (even if these records are not necessarily visible in the PO history). A record is created for each consumed component in table EKBE with VGABE = '7'. These records contain the quantity and the value of the components. This is important as the value of the condition GWLB is determined from these records in the transaction MEIS. Furthermore, the CPU date and the CPU time (date and time of entry) of these records correspond to that of the related GRs, which allows their assignment.

For the Intrastat reporting of arrivals from subcontracting, in addition to the standard condition type GRWR, another condition type is required: GWLB. Why?

Checking the above figure, it becomes clear that the value in the invoice does not contain the value of the materials used, as these were provided ("supplied") by the subcontractor itself. As the statistical value must contain the full value of the goods at border-crossing, information on the value of the supplied components is required. Because of this, for the calculation of the total statistical value of the final product, in addition to the "normal" condition type GRWR (which is derived from the net value of the supplier invoice / PO item), another condition type must be used which contains the value of the supplied components as well: GWLB.

In a sub-contracting scenario, the delivery of the components and the finished products must be reported.


Subcontracting is not yet supported by Intrastat reporting in the SAP S/4HANA Public edition.

5. Supplier Consignment


What is Supplier Consignment?

The supplier's goods are delivered to my plant ("consignment fill-up"), but the ownership of the goods remains with them. The goods are managed in their stock ("consignment stock"). I own these goods only upon the "consignment withdrawal." The invoice is created after the consignment issue.

We separate between Supplier Consignment with or without Simplified VAT Rules. With simplified rules, the supplier does not need to be registered for VAT in the country where the supplier’s consignment stock is located. Details on consignment with simplified VAT rules (aka intra-community call-off stocks) can be found in the SAP Note 2842899.

Terminology:

Consignment stock = supplier's stock, stored and managed in my plant

Consignment order = I order goods from a supplier who delivers these into his consignment stock in my plant

Consignment fill-up = supplier delivers the goods into his consignment stock in my plant

Consignment issue/withdrawal = goods are posted from the supplier's consignment stock into my own stock (with the aim of consumption, further processing, or selling)

Consignment pickup = supplier retrieves the goods from his own consignment stock

Supplier Consignment without Simplified VAT Rules

The supplier must be registered for VAT in the country where the supplier’s consignment stock is located.


 

Intrastat reporting obligations:




  • For consignment fill-up, the supplier must report the Dispatch in Country B and the Arrival in Country A.

  • For consignment pick-up, the supplier must report the Arrival in Country B and the Dispatch in Country A. Note: For France and Italy, special rules must be applied.


For consignment fill-up, the system currently reports the Arrival for company A in country A, which is incorrect.


For consignment pick-up, the system currently reports Dispatch for company A in country A, which is also incorrect.


System behavior can, however, be changed in the BAdI BADI_INTRASTAT_SELECTION in S/4HANA OP and S/4HANA Private Cloud.


Supplier Consignment with Simplified VAT Rules

The supplier does not need to be registered for VAT in the country where the supplier’s consignment stock is located.


Details on consignment with simplified VAT rules (aka intra-community call-off stocks) can be found in the SAP Note 2842899.


Intrastat reporting obligations:




  • For consignment fill-up, the supplier must report the Dispatch in Country B and Company A the Arrival in Country A. Note: For France, Hungary, and Italy, special rules must be applied.

  • For consignment pick-up, the supplier must report the Arrival in Country B and Company A the Dispatch in Country A. Note: For France, Hungary, and Italy, special rules must be applied.


Note: Special rules for France, Hungary, and Italy are currently not supported.




6. Customer Consignment


What is Customer Consignment?

Consignment stock comprises goods that are sent to and stored at the Customer's location (consignee) but owned by the sending company (consignor). The Customer must only pay for these goods when they remove them from consignment stock. The Customer can return consignment goods that are not required without being invoiced.

We separate between Customer Consignment with or without Simplified VAT Rules. With simplified rules, Sending Company does not need to be registered for VAT in the country where its consignment stock is located. Details on consignment with simplified VAT rules (aka intra-community call-off stocks) can be found in the SAP Note 2842899.

Terminology:

Consignment stock = Company's stock, stored and managed in the Customer's plant.

Consignment fill-up = Company delivers the goods into its consignment stock in the Customer's plant.

Consignment issue/withdrawal = goods are posted from the company's consignment stock into the Customer's own stock (with the aim of consumption, further processing, or selling)

 

Customer Consignment without Simplified VAT Rules


Company A must be registered for VAT in the country where its consignment stock is located.


Intrastat reporting obligations:




  • For consignment fill-up, Company A must report the Dispatch in Country B and the Arrival in Country A.

  • For consignment pick-up, Company A must report the Arrival in Country B and the Dispatch in Country A. Note: For France and Italy, special rules must be applied.


Customer Consignment with Simplified VAT Rules


Company A does not need to be registered for VAT in the country where its consignment stock is located.


Details on consignment with simplified VAT rules (aka intra-community call-off stocks) can be found in the SAP Note 2842899.


Intrastat reporting obligations:




  • For consignment fill-up, Company A must report the Dispatch in Country B and Customer the Arrival in Country A. Note: For France, Hungary, and Italy, special rules must be applied.

  • For consignment pick-up, Company A must report the Arrival in Country B and Customer the Dispatch in Country A. Note: For France, Hungary, and Italy, special rules must be applied.


Note: Country-specific rules are supported in S/4HANA Public Cloud, but currently not supported in S/4HANA OP and S/4HANA Private Cloud.


System behavior can, however, be changed in the BAdI BADI_INTRASTAT_SELECTION in S/4HANA OP and S/4HANA Private Cloud.


In the SAP S/4HANA Public edition, the dispatch and the receipt are reported based on RITA tax documents. RITA tax documents are created with reference to the material documents representing consignment fill-up and pick-up in customer consignment.

Scenario Overview



 

Credits


This blog would never have been made without the previous work of

rohit.trivedi

szilvia.hilken

and many more.

 

Abbreviations



  • F2 = Delivery Related Billing Document

  • RE = Credit for return

  • G2 = Credit memo

  • L2 =Debit memo

  • S1=Cancellation Billing Type for F2

  • F5 = Proforma Invoice for Sales Order

  • PO = Purchase Order

  • Del = Delivery

  • UB= Intracompany Purchase Order

  • NB=Intercompany Purchase Order

  • IV = Intercompany Invoice

  • IG = Intercompany Credit Note

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