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debugging

Former Member
0 Kudos

hi all,

if we have 1000 line code how we can debug the code.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Former Member
0 Kudos

HI,

you can have many number of lines,

in that case put break - points at the place where you wnat to

debug the exact code ,

then it wil be easier for you to do the debugging..

reward points if helpful,

thanks & regards,

venkatesh

6 REPLIES 6

Former Member
0 Kudos

Hi,

Activate the Debugger before executing your ABAP program

System -> Utilities -> Debug ABAP/4

The purpose of the debugger is to allow you to execute your program line by line. It also allow you display the data as you execute the program. (double click on the varaible field name and it will be display)

or after program have been executed,

Run transaction SM66 and find your work process.

Select the line of your work process and double click on it

Click the debugging option.

If this is a custom program, you can put a wait statement in the code to buy yourself some time.

-


1) To understand the Watchpoint, you have to play with it.

a) Debug your program.

b) Place your cursor on the field you want to watch

c) Press Shift+F8, or click the Create Watchpoint button

d) Select the LOCAL WATCHPOINT checkbox if you want the watchpoint to be active for the immediate program only (and not includes etc. By default, you want to leave this unchecked).

e) Drop down on the relational operator, and choose one. They are self-explanatory. (For this example, use '=')

f) Select the COMPARISON FIELD checkbox if you want to check the field against another field, else leave unchecked if you want to check your field against a static value.

g) Enter your comparison field (if you checked the previous box) or your check value in the last box. Once your selected field equals the selected value, the program will break as if a breakpoint was reached. It is possible that the program never breaks, meaning your watchpoint criteria was never satisfied (For example if you check Itab-Field = VALUEA, if Itab-field never have a value equal to VALUEA the program will NOT break.)

2) I use SQL Trace is used for analysis, then based on the information retrieved I do manual tuning.

http://help.sap.com/saphelp_nw2004s/helpdata/en/c6/617ca9e68c11d2b2ab080009b43351/content.htm

Regards

Sudheer

Former Member
0 Kudos

HI,

you can have many number of lines,

in that case put break - points at the place where you wnat to

debug the exact code ,

then it wil be easier for you to do the debugging..

reward points if helpful,

thanks & regards,

venkatesh

Former Member
0 Kudos

hi,

ABAP Debugger

The ABAP Debugger is an integrated test tool within the ABAP Workbench. You use it to check the program logic and to find errors in the source code of an ABAP program. In the Debugger, you can step through the source code of a program. The running program is interrupted after each step, allowing you to check its processing logic and the results of individual statements.

As of Release 6.10, you can also run Business Server Pages (BSP) in the debugging mode. You can also display and set breakpoints here. Business Server Pages can be displayed in the Object Navigator when you select an appropriate application under BSP Application.

Features

The Debugger provides an efficient means of identifying errors in ABAP programs. It contains the following functions:

• Ways of starting the Debugger

• Choosing different views

• Choosing different execution options in the Debugger

• Displaying source code in the Debugger

• Setting and deleting breakpoints

• Setting and deleting watchpoints

• Stopping a program at a particular statement or event

• Displaying and changing field contents at runtime

• Displaying ABAP Objects and references

• Displaying and positioning strings

• Setting and deleting database locks

• Opening the ABAP Editor, or Object Navigator

• System settings and runtime warnings

Starting the Debugger

There are two possible strategies for starting the Debugger in the ABAP Workbench:

• By setting breakpoints then running the program

• By running the program in debugging mode.

Setting Breakpoints

A breakpoint is a signal in a line of code that tells the ABAP runtime processor to interrupt the program at that line and start the ABAP Debugger. A distinction is made between static and dynamic breakpoints. For further information about the different types of breakpoints and how to use them, refer to Breakpoints.

Running a Program in Debugging Mode

You can start the Debugger without previously having set breakpoints. This is the best procedure to use when you want to test a program right from the beginning. It is also useful if you do not know the program very well and therefore are not sure where best to set breakpoints. You can start the Debugger as follows:

From the Object Navigator Select a report or transaction and program and choose Program Test Debugging.

From the ABAP Editor Choose Program  Execute  Debugging (or the Debugging pushbutton).

From any screen Choose System  Utilities  Debug ABAP.

From any screen Enter " /h " in the command field.

Checking System Programs for Errors

To check a program or program component that is part of the ABAP Workbench (for example, the Screen Painter), you must use the system Debugger. To start the system Debugger, choose

System  Utilities  Debug system from any screen. To stop the system Debugger, choose Debugger  Debugging off.

Displaying Program Attributes

You can display the attributes Fixed point arithmetic, System program and Unicode checks active of the program that has just been executed by choosing Goto  Further Information  Program Attributes.

Display Modes in the Debugger

When you are debugging a program, there are various display modes that you can use. All of the display modes have the same structure. The top part of the screen displays an extract of the program source code. The bottom part displays the information specifically available in that display mode. There are also pushbuttons on the screen allowing you to switch to the most frequently-used display modes.

Display Modes Available Using Pushbuttons

Fields The scrollable field display contains the contents of up to eight fields. The contents of the three most important system fields are always displayed. This is the default display mode in the Debugger. See also Processing Fields

Table Displays the contents of an internal table. This mode allows you to display and edit the entries in an internal table. See also Processing Internal Tables

Breakpoints A scrollable display containing up to 30 breakpoints. Next to each breakpoint is a counter. You can also delete breakpoints in this display. See also Managing Dynamic Breakpoints

Watchpoints You can set a watchpoint for a field so that the program is interrupted whenever the value of that field changes. This display mode contains a list of watchpoints, the fields and programs to which they are assigned, the current values of the fields, and the conditions upon which the watchpoint is activated. See also Setting Watchpoints

Calls This mode displays the current sequence of events, and the sequence of calls up to the current breakpoint. The last active call is displayed at the top of the list; previous calls are listed in reverse chronological order. When an event (for example, START-OF-SELECTION) concludes, it is deleted from the display.

Overview This mode displays the structure of the program. It lists its events, subroutines, and modules, and shows which sections belong to which events. It also displays the section currently being processed.

Settings This mode displays the current Debugger settings. You can change the settings by selecting or deselecting various options. For further information, refer to Settings and Warnings

Other Display Modes

You can access other display modes by choosing Goto  Display data object.

Single field Displays the contents and technical attributes of a field.

Structured

field Displays the components of a structure, along with their contents and attributes. If you double-click a component, the system displays detailed information for it.

Strings Display the content and current length of the string. You can also display part of the content by means of offset and length.

Internal table Displays the type, line numbers and contents of an internal table.

Object Displays the structure of an ABAP Object.

For further information on these displays, refer to Displaying Attributes and Displaying ABAP Objects

Breakpoints

Instead of starting an ABAP program directly in the Debugger, you can also debug a program by creating one or more breakpoints in the program. A breakpoint is a signal at a particular point in the program that tells the ABAP runtime processor to interrupt processing and start the Debugger. The program runs normally until the breakpoint is reached.

There is also a special kind of breakpoint called a watchpoint. When you use watchpoints, the Debugger is not activated until the contents of a particular field change. For further information, refer to Watchpoints.

Breakpoint Variants

The Debugger contains different breakpoint variants:

Static The BREAK-POINT statement in an ABAP program. Static breakpoints are not normally user-specific. However, you can make them user-specific.

Directly-set

dynamic breakpoints Can be set in the ABAP Editor or the Debugger. Dynamic breakpoints are always user-specific, and are deleted when you log off from the R/3 System.

Breakpoint

at statement The Debugger stops the program directly before the specified statement is executed.

Breakpoint

at subroutine The Debugger stops the program directly before the specified subroutine is called.

Breakpoint at function module The Debugger stops the program directly before the specified function module is called.

Breakpoint at method The Debugger stops the program directly before the specified method is called.

Breakpoints at system exceptions The Debugger stops the program directly after a system exception, that is, after a runtime error has been intercepted.

Use

Static Breakpoints

Static breakpoints are not normally user-specific. Once a user has inserted a BREAK-POINT statement in an ABAP program, the system always interrupts the program at that point. You should only use static breakpoints during the development phase of an application. You should set static breakpoints whenever more than one programmer is working on the same program and you always want to stop the program in the same place.

Dynamic Breakpoints

Dynamic breakpoints are user-specific. You should, therefore, use them when you only want the program to be interrupted when you run it yourself. All dynamic breakpoints are deleted when you log off from the R/3 System.

Dynamic breakpoints are more flexible than static breakpoints, because you can deactivate or delete them at runtime. They have the following advantages:

• You do not have to change the program code

• You can set them even when the program is locked by another programmer

• You can define a counter (for example, only activate the breakpoint after it has been reached five times).

Special Dynamic Breakpoints

Special dynamic breakpoints are useful when you want to interrupt a program directly before a particular ABAP statement, a subroutine, or an event, but do not know exactly where to find it in the program code. Event here is used to refer to the occurrence of a particular statement, for

example, or calling up a method. Special dynamic breakpoints are user-specific. You can only set them in the Debugger.

Transferring Breakpoints to HTTP and Update Sessions

If an HTTP or update session is called from a Logical Unit of Work (LUW), new work processes are started for these new sessions. Breakpoints that were defined beforehand in the calling LUW are copied to these sessions where they can be displayed under breakpoints.

If, for example, the update module func is called via CALL FUNCTION func IN UPDATE TASK, the new work process is displayed in a second window if Update debugging was selected under Settings in the debugging mode. All the breakpoints that were set in the calling LUW can then be processed here.

Static Breakpoints

You should only use static breakpoints during the development phase of an application. You must remove them from your program before you transport it.

Setting Breakpoints

To set a static breakpoint, use the ABAP statement BREAK-POINT . Place the breakpoint in the line at which you want to interrupt the program.

program RSDEBUG_01.

....

if SY-SUBRC <> 0.

break-point.

endif.

....

When you run the program, the runtime processor interrupts it when the breakpoints occur. You can number your breakpoints to make them easier to identify ( BREAK-POINT 1, BREAK-POINT 2 …).

Static breakpoints are not normally user-specific. The program is, therefore, always interrupted as soon as the runtime processor reaches the line containing the breakpoint. The program is interrupted regardless of the user who executes it.

However, you can set user-specific static breakpoints using the BREAK statement followed by your user name. For example, if you use the statement BREAK SMITH , the program is only interrupted when user Smith runs it. Although user-specific breakpoints appear in the program code, they are not active when other users run the program. You should, however, be careful if an application is being used by several users with the same name.

Deleting Breakpoints

Since static breakpoints apply to all users, you must remove them from the program once you have finished testing it. In the ABAP Editor, you can find breakpoints quickly by choosing Utilities &#61614; Global search. You can also use the Extended Program Check to find them.

If you do not remove static breakpoints from your program, they will be transported to your production system. This could cause serious problems in the production system.

Dynamic Breakpoints

You can set up to 30 dynamic breakpoints without changing the program code. Dynamic breakpoints can be set either in the ABAP Editor or directly in the Debugger.

Setting Dynamic Breakpoints in the ABAP Editor

You can set dynamic breakpoints in the ABAP Editor regardless of whether you are in display or change mode. You can also set breakpoints directly from within the Debugger at runtime. To set a dynamic breakpoint in the ABAP Editor:

1. Position the cursor on the line of the source code at which you want to set the breakpoint.

example, or calling up a method. Special dynamic breakpoints are user-specific. You can only set them in the Debugger.

Transferring Breakpoints to HTTP and Update Sessions

If an HTTP or update session is called from a Logical Unit of Work (LUW), new work processes are started for these new sessions. Breakpoints that were defined beforehand in the calling LUW are copied to these sessions where they can be displayed under breakpoints.

If, for example, the update module func is called via CALL FUNCTION func IN UPDATE TASK, the new work process is displayed in a second window if Update debugging was selected under Settings in the debugging mode. All the breakpoints that were set in the calling LUW can then be processed here.

Static Breakpoints

You should only use static breakpoints during the development phase of an application. You must remove them from your program before you transport it.

Setting Breakpoints

To set a static breakpoint, use the ABAP statement BREAK-POINT . Place the breakpoint in the line at which you want to interrupt the program.

program RSDEBUG_01.

....

if SY-SUBRC <> 0.

break-point.

endif.

....

When you run the program, the runtime processor interrupts it when the breakpoints occur. You can number your breakpoints to make them easier to identify ( BREAK-POINT 1, BREAK-POINT 2 …).

Static breakpoints are not normally user-specific. The program is, therefore, always interrupted as soon as the runtime processor reaches the line containing the breakpoint. The program is interrupted regardless of the user who executes it.

However, you can set user-specific static breakpoints using the BREAK statement followed by your user name. For example, if you use the statement BREAK SMITH , the program is only interrupted when user Smith runs it. Although user-specific breakpoints appear in the program code, they are not active when other users run the program. You should, however, be careful if an application is being used by several users with the same name.

Deleting Breakpoints

Since static breakpoints apply to all users, you must remove them from the program once you have finished testing it. In the ABAP Editor, you can find breakpoints quickly by choosing Utilities &#61614; Global search. You can also use the Extended Program Check to find them.

If you do not remove static breakpoints from your program, they will be transported to your production system. This could cause serious problems in the production system.

Dynamic Breakpoints

You can set up to 30 dynamic breakpoints without changing the program code. Dynamic breakpoints can be set either in the ABAP Editor or directly in the Debugger.

Setting Dynamic Breakpoints in the ABAP Editor

You can set dynamic breakpoints in the ABAP Editor regardless of whether you are in display or change mode. You can also set breakpoints directly from within the Debugger at runtime. To set a dynamic breakpoint in the ABAP Editor:

1. Position the cursor on the line of the source code at which you want to set the breakpoint.

You can use this kind of dynamic breakpoint to interrupt a program directly before a function module is called.

Prerequisites

You must already be running the program in the Debugger.

Procedure

To set a breakpoint for a function module:

1. Choose Breakpoint &#61614; Breakpoint at &#61614; Function module...

2. Enter the name of the function module before which you want to interrupt the program. The system sets a breakpoint wherever the specified event, module pool, or subroutine occurs in the program code.

3. Choose ENTER.

Result

If you entered a valid function module name, the system confirms that the breakpoint has been set. If the function module exists in the system, the new breakpoint is added to the display list.

Breakpoints at System Exceptions

You can use this special form of dynamic breakpoint to interrupt a program immediately after a runtime error has occurred.

Prerequisites

You must already be running the program in the Debugger.

Procedure

To set a breakpoint at a system exception:

Choose Breakpoint &#61614; Breakpoint at &#61614; System exception.

Result

The system confirms the breakpoint. The breakpoint is added to the breakpoints displayed.

When a system exception is triggered, a warning triangle appears in the line containing the statement that caused it. If you double-click the warning triangle, the internal name of the runtime error appears.

Saving Breakpoints

If you want to leave the Debugger temporarily, you can save your dynamic breakpoints so that they are still active when you return to the Debugger within the same terminal session.

To save the breakpoints that you have set in the Debugger:

Choose Breakpoint &#61614; Save.

The system saves all of the breakpoints that you have set in the current program. These breakpoints will remain active until you either explicitly delete them or log off from the system.

You can also delete breakpoints that you have saved:

• By deleting individual breakpoints from the display and then saving again. In this case, only your selected breakpoints will be deleted.

• By choosing Breakpoint &#61614; Delete all. In this case, the system deletes all dynamic breakpoints.

Managing Dynamic Breakpoints

The ABAP Debugger provides a convenient user interface for managing breakpoints. To open the breakpoint display, choose Breakpoints, or, from the menu, Goto &#61614; Control debugging &#61614; Breakpoints.

Functions

This display mode contains the following functions for breakpoints:

Breakpoint Display

The scrollable breakpoint display contains up to 30 dynamic breakpoints. For breakpoints that you set directly, the program name and line number at which the breakpoint occurs are displayed. For special breakpoint forms, the list displays the statements, events, subroutines, and module calls at which the relevant breakpoints are set.

Counter

In the breakpoint display, you can specify a counter. When you use a counter, the breakpoint is not activated until it has been reached a specified number of times. For example, if you enter 5 for the counter, the breakpoint is not activated until it is reached for the fifth time. After the breakpoint has been activated, it remains so, and the counter no longer appears in the breakpoint display.

Deleting Breakpoints

Position the cursor on the breakpoint that you want to delete, and either double-click the line or choose Breakpoint &#61614; Set/delete. To delete all breakpoints, choose Breakpoint &#61614; Delete all.

Activating and Deactivating Breakpoints

Position the cursor on the breakpoint that you want to activate or deactivate and choose Breakpoint &#61614; Activate/deactivate.

Former Member
0 Kudos

Hi,

If u wan to debug the specific line in the pgm, set a brek-point there.

or if u want to debug based on certain values in a variable , set the watch point by giving the pgm name, variable name and value.

If dont know anything abt tht code, u have to to debug from start

Regards,

Nikhil

Former Member
0 Kudos

HI Srinivas,

Chk these threads, it will be helpful.

http://help.sap.com/saphelp_nw04/helpdata/en/c6/617ce8e68c11d2b2ab080009b43351/frameset.htm

<b>***Rewards Points if Useful</b>

Regards

Gokul

Former Member
0 Kudos

Watchpoints


a watchpoint is an indicator in a program that tells the ABAP runtime processor to interrupt the program at a particular point. Unlike breakpoints, however, watchpoints are not activated until the contents of a specified field change. Watchpoints, like dynamic breakpoints, are user-specific, and so do not affect other users running the same program. You can only define watchpoints in the Debugger.
Use
You set watchpoints in the Debugger to monitor the contents of specific fields. They inform you when the value of a field changes. When the value changes, the Debugger interrupts the program.
Features
· You can set up to five watchpoints in a program.
See also Setting Watchpoints.
· You can also specify the conditions under which a watchpoint is to become active.
· You can specify a logical link for up to five (conditional) watchpoints.
See also Specifying Logical Links.
· You can define watchpoints as either local or global. If you define a global watchpoint, it is active in all called programs. Local watchpoints are only active in
the specified program.
· You can change and delete watchpoints.
See Changing Watchpoints
· You can use watchpoints to display changes to the references of strings, data and object references, and internal tables.
See Memory Monitoring with Watchpoints

Breakpoints

Apart from being able to execute an ABAP program in the Debugger, you can also start the Debugger call by the choosing a breakpoint. This is achieved by setting one or more of these breakpoints in the program. A breakpoint is a signal at a particular point in the program that tells the ABAP runtime processor to interrupt processing and start the Debugger. The Debugger is activated when the program reaches this point.

There is also a special kind of breakpoint called a watchpoint. When you use watchpoints, the Debugger is not activated until the contents of a particular field change. For more information, refer to the chapter Watchpoints.

Breakpoint Variants


The Debugger contains different breakpoint variants:



Static


A user-specific breakpoint is inserted in the source code as an ABAP statement using the keyword BREAK-POINT. A non user-specific breakpoint is set in the ABAP Editor using the BREAK user name statement.

Directly set



dynamic breakpoints
Can be set in the ABAP Editor or the Debugger by double-clicking a line, for example. Dynamic breakpoints are always user-specific, and are deleted when you log off from the R/3 System.

Breakpoints



at statements
The Debugger stops the program immediately before the specified statement is executed.

Breakpoints



at subroutines
The Debugger stops the program immediately before the specified subroutine is called.

Breakpoints at function modules


The Debugger stops the program immediately before the specified function module is called.

Breakpoints at methods


The Debugger stops the program immediately before the specified method is called.

Breakpoints at exceptions and system exceptions


The Debugger stops the program immediately after a system exception, that is, after a runtime error has been intercepted.




Static Breakpoints


Static breakpoints are always user-independent if there is no specification of a user name. Once a user has inserted the statement BREAK-POINT or BREAK name in an ABAP program, the system always interrupts the program at that point for that user or only for the user name. This procedure is only useful in the development phase of an application when program execution is always to be interrupted at the same place. For more information, refer to the chapter Static Breakpoints.

In HTTP sessions, a static breakpoint is skipped if you did not set additional dynamic HTTP breakpoints in the editor of a BSP page. Instead, a corresponding system log entry is written, which can be checked using transaction SM21.



Dynamic Breakpoints

Dynamic breakpoints are user-specific. Therefore, you should use them if you only want the program to be interrupted when you run it yourself, not when it is being executed by other users. All dynamic breakpoints are deleted when you log off from the R/3 System.

Dynamic breakpoints are more flexible than static breakpoints because you can deactivate or delete them at runtime. They have the following advantages:

· You do not have to change the program code.

· You can set them even when the program is locked by another programmer.

· You can define a counter that only activates the breakpoint after it has been reached.

Special dynamic breakpoints are useful when you want to interrupt a program directly before a particular ABAP statement, a subroutine, or an event, but do not know exactly where to find it in the source code. Event here is used to refer to the occurrence of a particular statement, for example, or calling up a method. Special dynamic breakpoints are user-specific. You can only set them in the Debugger. For more information, refer to the chapter Dynamic Breakpoints.

reward points if it is usefull ....

Girish