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break points

Former Member
0 Kudos

Hi Experts,I am new to SAP. I seek steps to create a break points ,Advantages of break points and difference between session and external break points?????Can u just help me out?

Regards,

G.Srinivasan.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Former Member
0 Kudos

Hi,

A breakpoint is a signal at a particular point in the program that tells the ABAP runtime processor to interrupt processing and start the Debugger. The Debugger is activated when the program reaches this point.Max 30 breakpoints we can use.

Session Breakpoints exist only until you are logged in or until ur session is active. Even if u forget to remove the session break points, they are automatically removed once ur session becomes invalid or u logged out.

Debugger

This section of the ABAP Workbench documentation provides information on how to use the Debugger as a test tool for finding errors in the source code of an ABAP program.

Functional Overview

Use

The ABAP Debugger is an integrated test tool within the ABAP Workbench. You use it to check the program logic and to find errors in the source code of an ABAP program. In the Debugger, you can step through the source code of a program. The running program is interrupted after each step, allowing you to check its processing logic and the results of individual statements.

As of Release 6.10, you can also run Business Server Pages (BSP) in the debugging mode. You can also display and set breakpoints here. Business Server Pages can be displayed in the Object Navigator when you select an appropriate application under BSP Application.

Features

The Debugger provides an efficient means of identifying errors in ABAP programs. It contains the following functions:

Ways of starting the Debugger

Choosing different views

Choosing different execution options in the Debugger

Displaying source code in the Debugger

• Setting and deleting breakpoints

• Setting and deleting watchpoints

• Stopping a program at a particular statement or event

Displaying and changing field contents at runtime

Displaying ABAP Objects and references

Displaying and positioning strings

Setting and deleting database locks

Opening the ABAP Editor, or Object Navigator

System settings and runtime warnings

Starting the Debugger

There are two possible strategies for starting the Debugger in the ABAP Workbench:

By setting breakpoints then running the program

By running the program in debugging mode.

Setting Breakpoints

A breakpoint is a signal in a specific line of the program source code. This signal indicates to the ABAP runtime processor to stop the program at the relevant line and start the ABAP Debugger. A distinction is made between static and dynamic breakpoints. For further information about the different types of breakpoints and how to use them, refer to Breakpoints.

Direct Processing

You can start the Debugger without previously having set breakpoints. This is the best procedure to use when you want to test a program right from the beginning. It is also a useful procedure if you are not overly familiar with the program and therefore are not sure where best to set breakpoints. You can start the Debugger as follows:

From the Object Navigator

Select a report or transaction and choose Program ® Test ® Debugging.

From the ABAP Editor

Choose Program ® Execute ® Debugging (or the Debugging pushbutton).

From any screen

Choose System ® Utilities ® Debug ABAP.

From any screen

Enter /h in the command field.

Display Modes in the Debugger

When you are debugging a program, there are various display modes that you can use. All of the display modes have the same structure. The top part of the screen displays an extract of the program source code. The bottom part displays the information specifically available in that display mode. There are also pushbuttons on the screen allowing you to switch to the most frequently-used display modes.

Display Modes Available Using Pushbuttons

Fields

The scrollable field display contains the contents of up to eight fields. The contents of the three most important system fields are always displayed. This is the default display mode in the Debugger. See also Processing Fields

Table

Displays the contents of an internal table. This mode allows you to display and edit the entries in an internal table. See also Processing Internal Tables

Breakpoints

A scrollable display containing up to 30 breakpoints. Next to each breakpoint is a counter. You can also delete breakpoints in this display. See also Managing Dynamic Breakpoints

Watchpoints

You can set a watchpoint for a field so that the program is interrupted whenever the value of that field changes. This display mode contains a list of watchpoints, the fields and programs to which they are assigned, the current values of the fields, and the conditions upon which the watchpoint is activated. See also Setting Watchpoints

Calls

This mode displays the current sequence of events, and the sequence of calls up to the current breakpoint. The last active call is displayed at the top of the list; previous calls are listed in reverse chronological order. When an event (for example, START-OF-SELECTION) concludes, it is deleted from the display.

Overview

This mode displays the structure of the program. It lists its events, subroutines, and modules, and shows which sections belong to which events. It also displays the section currently being processed.

Settings

This mode displays the current Debugger settings. You can change the settings by selecting or deselecting various options. For further information, refer to Settings and Warnings

Other Display Modes

You can access other display modes by choosing Goto ® Display data object.

Single field

Displays the contents and technical attributes of a field.

Structured

field

Displays the components of a structure, along with their contents and attributes. If you double-click a component, the system displays detailed information for it.

Strings

Display the content and current length of the string. You can also display part of the content by means of offset and length.

Internal table

Displays the type, line numbers and contents of an internal table.

Object

Displays the structure of an ABAP Object.

For further information on these displays, refer to Displaying Attributes and Displaying ABAP Objects

Checking System Programs for Errors

To check a program or program component that is part of the ABAP Workbench (for example, the Screen Painter), you must use the system Debugger. To start the system Debugger, choose System ® Utilities ® Debug System from any screen. To stop the system Debugger, choose Debugger ® Debugging off.

Displaying Program Attributes

You can display the attributes Fixed Point Arithmetic, System Program, and Unicode Checks of the program that has just been executed by choosing Goto ® Further Information ® Program Attributes.

Restarting the Debugger

If you choose Debugging ® Restart, debugging mode is stopped and the system takes you to the initial screen of the last transaction you called. If, for example, you started an ABAP program in debugging mode from transaction SE38 (ABAP Editor), choosing Debugging ® Restart will take you back to the screen titled ABAP Editor: Initial Screen. If you want to restart the program in debugging mode, choose Debugging.

Breakpoints

Apart from direct execution of an ABAP program in the Debugger, it is also possible to start the Debugger call by the exact setting of a breakpoint. This is achieved by setting one or more of these breakpoints in the program. A breakpoint is a signal at a particular point in the program that tells the ABAP runtime processor to interrupt processing and start the Debugger. The program runs normally until the breakpoint is reached.

There is also a special kind of breakpoint called a watchpoint. When you use watchpoints, the Debugger is not activated until the contents of a particular field change. For further information, refer to Watchpoints.

Breakpoint Variants

The Debugger contains different breakpoint variants:

Static

The BREAK-POINT statement in an ABAP program. Static breakpoints are not normally user-specific. However, you can make them user-specific.

Directly-set

dynamic breakpoints

Can be set in the ABAP Editor or the Debugger. Dynamic breakpoints are always user-specific, and are deleted when you log off from the R/3 System.

Breakpoints

at statement

The Debugger stops the program directly before the specified statement is executed.

Breakpoints

at subroutine

The Debugger stops the program directly before the specified subroutine is called.

Breakpoint at function module

The Debugger stops the program directly before the specified function module is called.

Breakpoint at method

The Debugger stops the program directly before the specified method is called.

Breakpoints at system exceptions

The Debugger stops the program directly after a system exception, that is, after a runtime error has been intercepted.

Static Breakpoints

Static breakpoints are not normally user-specific. Once a user has inserted the statement BREAK-POINT or BREAK name in an ABAP program, the system always interrupts the program at that point for that user or only for the user name. This procedure is only useful in the development phase of an application, when the program execution is always to be interrupted at the same place. For further information, refer to Static Breakpoints.

In HTTP sessions, a static breakpoint is skipped if you did not set additional dynamic HTTP breakpoints in the editor of a BSP page. Instead, a corresponding system log entry is written, which can be checked using transaction SM21.

Dynamic Breakpoints

Dynamic breakpoints are user-specific. Therefore, you should use them if you only want the program to be interrupted when you run it yourself, not when it is being executed by other users. All dynamic breakpoints are deleted when you log off from the R/3 System.

Dynamic breakpoints are more flexible than static breakpoints, because you can deactivate or delete them at runtime. They have the following advantages:

You do not have to change the program code

You can set them even when the program is locked by another programmer

You can define a counter that only activates the breakpoint after it has been reached

Special dynamic breakpoints are useful when you want to interrupt a program directly before a particular ABAP statement, a subroutine, or an event, but do not know exactly where to find it in the source code. Event here is used to refer to the occurrence of a particular statement, for example, or calling up a method. Special dynamic breakpoints are user-specific. You can only set them in the Debugger. For further information, refer to Dynamic Breakpoints.

In HTTP sessions, the system stops both at static and dynamic breakpoints if a dynamic breakpoint was set in the editor of a BSP page before program execution.

Lifetime and Transfer of Breakpoints

A static breakpoint remains intact as long as the BREAK-POINT or BREAK-POINT name statement is not removed from the source code. Without saving, dynamic breakpoints only remain intact in the relevant internal session. However, they are effective during the entire user session, if they are saved by choosing Breakpoints ® Save in the ABAP Debugger. For more details on the subject of sessions and user sessions, refer to Modularization Techniques in the ABAP keyword documentation.

If you call an HTTP session during a user session, only the HTTP breakpoints are loaded when the HTTP session is started. You activate HTTP debugging in the ABAP Editor by choosing Utilities ® Settings ® HTTP Debugging. Depending on the setting, the system then displays either the HTTP or standard breakpoints in the Editor.

If you call an update session during a user session, breakpoints that were defined beforehand in the calling processing unit are copied to the new update session, where they can be displayed under Breakpoints. If, in the ABAP Debugger, you check Update Debugging under Settings and then, for example, call the update module func using CALL FUNCTION func IN UPDATE TASK, a new window is opened in which you can debug this function module in the update session. All the breakpoints that were set in the calling processing unit can also be processed here.

Breakpoints at Statements

You can use this special kind of dynamic breakpoint to interrupt a program directly before an ABAP statement is processed.

Prerequisites

You must already be running the program in the Debugger.

Procedure

To set a breakpoint at an ABAP statement:

1.Choose Breakpoint ® Breakpoint at ® Statement...

The following dialog box appears:

2.Enter the ABAP statement.

The system sets a breakpoint at all points in the program at which the ABAP statement occurs.

3.Choose ENTER.

The breakpoint applies to all lines containing the specified statement.

Result

The system confirms the breakpoint and adds it to the list in the display. When you finish your debugging session, the breakpoint is automatically deleted unless you have explicitly saved it.

Breakpoints at Subroutines

You can use this special kind of dynamic breakpoint to interrupt a program directly before a subroutine is called.

Prerequisites

You must already be running the program in the Debugger.

Procedure

To set a breakpoint for a subroutine:

Choose Breakpoint ® Breakpoint at ® Event/Subroutine.

The following dialog box then appears:

Enter the name of the subroutine before which you want to interrupt the program. By default, the Program field contains the name of the program that is currently active. The system sets a breakpoint wherever the specified subroutine occurs in the program code.

Choose ENTER.

Result

The system confirms the breakpoint. The breakpoint is added to the breakpoints displayed.

Breakpoints at Function Module

You can use this kind of dynamic breakpoint to interrupt a program directly before a function module is called.

Prerequisites

You must already be running the program in the Debugger.

Procedure

To set a breakpoint for a function module:

Choose Breakpoint ® Breakpoint at ® Function module...

The following dialog box appears:

Enter the name of the function module before which you want to interrupt the program. The system sets a breakpoint wherever the specified event, module pool, or subroutine occurs in the program code.

Choose ENTER.

Result

If you entered a valid function module name, the system confirms that the breakpoint has been set. If the function module exists in the system, the new breakpoint is added to the display list.

Breakpoints at Methods

You can use this special kind of dynamic breakpoint to interrupt a program directly before a method is called.

Prerequisites

You must be already running the program in the debugger.

Procedure

To set a breakpoint for methods:

...

1. Choose Breakpoint ® Breakpoint at ® Method...

The following dialog box then appears:

2. Enter the name of the method and class before which you want to interrupt the program. A breakpoint is then set each time the specified processing block appears in the source code.

3. Choose ENTER.

Result

The system confirms the breakpoint. The breakpoint is added to the list in the display.

Breakpoints at System Exceptions

You can use this special form of dynamic breakpoint to interrupt a program immediately after a runtime error has occurred.

Prerequisites

You must already be running the program in the Debugger.

Procedure

To set a breakpoint at a system exception:

Choose Breakpoint ® Breakpoint at ® System exception.

Result

The system confirms the breakpoint. The breakpoint is added to the breakpoints displayed.

When a system exception is triggered, a warning triangle appears in the line containing the statement that caused it. If you double-click the warning triangle, the internal name of the runtime error appears.

Static Breakpoints

You should only use static breakpoints during the development phase of an application. You must remove them from your program before you transport it.

Setting Breakpoints

To set a static breakpoint, use the ABAP statement BREAK-POINT . Place the breakpoint in the line at which you want to interrupt the program.

program RSDEBUG_01.

....

if SY-SUBRC 0.

break-point.

endif.

....

When you run the program, the runtime processor interrupts it when the breakpoints occur. You can number your breakpoints to make them easier to identify ( BREAK-POINT 1, BREAK-POINT 2 …).

Static breakpoints are not normally user-specific. The program is, therefore, always interrupted as soon as the runtime processor reaches the line containing the breakpoint. The program is interrupted regardless of the user who executes it.

However, you can set user-specific static breakpoints using the BREAK statement followed by your user name. For example, if you use the statement BREAK SMITH , the program is only interrupted when user Smith runs it. Although user-specific breakpoints appear in the program code, they are not active when other users run the program. You should, however, be careful if an application is being used by several users with the same name.

Deleting Breakpoints

Since static breakpoints apply to all users, you must remove them from the program once you have finished testing it. In the ABAP Editor, you can find breakpoints quickly by choosing Utilities ® Global search. You can also use the Extended Program Check to find them.

If you do not remove static breakpoints from your program, they will be transported to your production system. This could cause serious problems in the production system.

Dynamic Breakpoints

You can set up to 30 dynamic breakpoints without changing the program code. Dynamic breakpoints can be set either in the ABAP Editor or directly in the Debugger.

Setting Dynamic Breakpoints in the ABAP Editor

You can set dynamic breakpoints in the ABAP Editor regardless of whether you are in display or change mode. You can also set breakpoints directly from within the Debugger at runtime. To set a dynamic breakpoint in the ABAP Editor:

Position the cursor on the line of the source code at which you want to set the breakpoint.

Choose Utilities ® Breakpoints ® Set or the Stop icon. The system confirms that the breakpoint has been set.

To display a list of all dynamic breakpoints in a program, choose Utilities ® Breakpoints ® Display. You can use this list to navigate to a particular breakpoint or to delete one or more breakpoints from the program.

Setting Dynamic Breakpoints in Debugging Mode

To set a dynamic breakpoint in the Debugger:

Position the cursor on the line in which you want to set the breakpoint.

Select the line by double-clicking it or choosing Breakpoint ® Set/delete.

The system sets the breakpoint, and displays a small stop sign to the left of the relevant line. If the line already contained a breakpoint, it is deleted.

When you finish your debugging session, the breakpoint is automatically deleted unless you have explicitly saved it.

Saving Breakpoints

If you want to leave the Debugger temporarily, you can save your dynamic breakpoints so that they are still active when you return to the Debugger within the same terminal session.

To save the breakpoints that you have set in the Debugger:

Choose Breakpoint ® Save.

The system saves all of the breakpoints that you have set in the current program. These breakpoints will remain active until you either explicitly delete them or log off from the system.

You can also delete breakpoints that you have saved:

By deleting individual breakpoints from the display and then saving again. In this case, only your selected breakpoints will be deleted.

By choosing Breakpoint ® Delete all. In this case, the system deletes all dynamic breakpoints.

Managing Dynamic Breakpoints

The ABAP Debugger provides a convenient user interface for managing breakpoints. To open the breakpoint display, choose Breakpoints, or, from the menu, Goto ® Control debugging ® Breakpoints.

Example

Functions

This display mode contains the following functions for breakpoints:

Breakpoint Display

The scrollable breakpoint display contains up to 30 dynamic breakpoints. For breakpoints that you set directly, the program name and line number at which the breakpoint occurs are displayed. For special breakpoint forms, the list displays the statements, events, subroutines, and module calls at which the relevant breakpoints are set.

Counter

In the breakpoint display, you can specify a counter. When you use a counter, the breakpoint is not activated until it has been reached a specified number of times. For example, if you enter 5 for the counter, the breakpoint is not activated until it is reached for the fifth time. After the breakpoint has been activated, it remains so, and the counter no longer appears in the breakpoint display.

Deleting Breakpoints

Position the cursor on the breakpoint that you want to delete, and either double-click the line or choose Breakpoint ® Set/delete. To delete all breakpoints, choose Breakpoint ® Delete all.

Activating and Deactivating Breakpoints

Position the cursor on the breakpoint that you want to activate or deactivate and choose Breakpoint ® Activate/deactivate.

Regards

Sailaja.

9 REPLIES 9

former_member156446
Active Contributor
0 Kudos

http://help.sap.com/saphelp_nw70/helpdata/en/c6/617cbee68c11d2b2ab080009b43351/content.htm

hi break points are the facility provided by SAP to stop ur code at a particular point as u want.. by creating a break point...

creating a break point : put ur cursor on the line where u need the break points and hit the stop buttton on the top toolbar.. ue line ill be highlighted with yellow color...

to remove it hit the stop agian.. u will remove the breakpoint..

advantages: think that u wrote a code a+b = c and u gave inputs 3 + 2 = 5 and ur output to the program gives 6... what will you do .. u cant sit a cry right.. so u put a break point there and find out why its giving 6 is it mulituplying of adding.. so that is the use of breakpoint..

session and external breakpoints are available from ECC, which are also similar to break points with additional functionality..

award points on the right if u feel helpful

Edited by: jackandjay on Dec 28, 2007 1:01 AM

Former Member
0 Kudos

Hi,

BREAK-POINT { [ID group]

| {[log_text] [AT NEXT APPLICATION STATEMENT]} }.

This statement defines an unconditional checkpoint (breakpoint). If the program reaches an active breakpoint during dialog processing, program execution is interrupted and the system switches to the ABAP Debugger. An inactive breakpoint will be ignored and program execution will continue with the statement following BREAK-POINT.

Without the ID addition, the breakpoint is always active. If the IDaddition is used, activation from outside the program will be controlled by a checkpoint group.

During background processing and during updating, program execution will not be interrupted. If the ID addition is specified, a breakpoint will always be inactive during breakpoint processing and during the updating process. If a breakpoint is always active, that is, the ID addition is not specified, the entry "Breakpoint reached" is written to the system log during background processing and during the udpate task. After the entry, the program name and the point where the breakpoint took place in the program are also recorded.

Addition 1

... ID group

Effect

The ID addition assigns the breakpoint to a checkpoint group group. The same rules apply to the checkpoint group and the activation settings as to the ASSERT statement.

Addition 2

... log_text

Effect

In log_text, a supplementary text for the system log can be specified. During dialog processing, the specification of log_text has no effect. During background processing and during the update task, the content of log_text in the system log is inserted between the words "Breakpoint" and "reached". For log_text, a flat, character-type data object with a length of 40 characters is expected. The specification of a data object of the type string is ignored.

Addition 3

... AT NEXT APPLICATION STATEMENT

Note

This addition is for internal use only.

It cannot be used in application programs

Effect

This statement is only useful in system programs, system modules, system subroutines, and system function modules whose name begins with %_ .

If system debugging is not switched on, the system will stop only at the next statement that is not in a system module.

If system debugging is switched on, the system will stop at the BREAK-POINT statement.

If system debugging is not switched on and the AT NEXT APPLICATION STATEMENT addition is not used, BREAK-POINT statements are ignored in system modules.

Plzz reward points if it helps.

Former Member
0 Kudos

Hi,

A breakpoint is a signal at a particular point in the program that tells the ABAP runtime processor to interrupt processing and start the Debugger. The Debugger is activated when the program reaches this point.Max 30 breakpoints we can use.

Session Breakpoints exist only until you are logged in or until ur session is active. Even if u forget to remove the session break points, they are automatically removed once ur session becomes invalid or u logged out.

Debugger

This section of the ABAP Workbench documentation provides information on how to use the Debugger as a test tool for finding errors in the source code of an ABAP program.

Functional Overview

Use

The ABAP Debugger is an integrated test tool within the ABAP Workbench. You use it to check the program logic and to find errors in the source code of an ABAP program. In the Debugger, you can step through the source code of a program. The running program is interrupted after each step, allowing you to check its processing logic and the results of individual statements.

As of Release 6.10, you can also run Business Server Pages (BSP) in the debugging mode. You can also display and set breakpoints here. Business Server Pages can be displayed in the Object Navigator when you select an appropriate application under BSP Application.

Features

The Debugger provides an efficient means of identifying errors in ABAP programs. It contains the following functions:

Ways of starting the Debugger

Choosing different views

Choosing different execution options in the Debugger

Displaying source code in the Debugger

• Setting and deleting breakpoints

• Setting and deleting watchpoints

• Stopping a program at a particular statement or event

Displaying and changing field contents at runtime

Displaying ABAP Objects and references

Displaying and positioning strings

Setting and deleting database locks

Opening the ABAP Editor, or Object Navigator

System settings and runtime warnings

Starting the Debugger

There are two possible strategies for starting the Debugger in the ABAP Workbench:

By setting breakpoints then running the program

By running the program in debugging mode.

Setting Breakpoints

A breakpoint is a signal in a specific line of the program source code. This signal indicates to the ABAP runtime processor to stop the program at the relevant line and start the ABAP Debugger. A distinction is made between static and dynamic breakpoints. For further information about the different types of breakpoints and how to use them, refer to Breakpoints.

Direct Processing

You can start the Debugger without previously having set breakpoints. This is the best procedure to use when you want to test a program right from the beginning. It is also a useful procedure if you are not overly familiar with the program and therefore are not sure where best to set breakpoints. You can start the Debugger as follows:

From the Object Navigator

Select a report or transaction and choose Program ® Test ® Debugging.

From the ABAP Editor

Choose Program ® Execute ® Debugging (or the Debugging pushbutton).

From any screen

Choose System ® Utilities ® Debug ABAP.

From any screen

Enter /h in the command field.

Display Modes in the Debugger

When you are debugging a program, there are various display modes that you can use. All of the display modes have the same structure. The top part of the screen displays an extract of the program source code. The bottom part displays the information specifically available in that display mode. There are also pushbuttons on the screen allowing you to switch to the most frequently-used display modes.

Display Modes Available Using Pushbuttons

Fields

The scrollable field display contains the contents of up to eight fields. The contents of the three most important system fields are always displayed. This is the default display mode in the Debugger. See also Processing Fields

Table

Displays the contents of an internal table. This mode allows you to display and edit the entries in an internal table. See also Processing Internal Tables

Breakpoints

A scrollable display containing up to 30 breakpoints. Next to each breakpoint is a counter. You can also delete breakpoints in this display. See also Managing Dynamic Breakpoints

Watchpoints

You can set a watchpoint for a field so that the program is interrupted whenever the value of that field changes. This display mode contains a list of watchpoints, the fields and programs to which they are assigned, the current values of the fields, and the conditions upon which the watchpoint is activated. See also Setting Watchpoints

Calls

This mode displays the current sequence of events, and the sequence of calls up to the current breakpoint. The last active call is displayed at the top of the list; previous calls are listed in reverse chronological order. When an event (for example, START-OF-SELECTION) concludes, it is deleted from the display.

Overview

This mode displays the structure of the program. It lists its events, subroutines, and modules, and shows which sections belong to which events. It also displays the section currently being processed.

Settings

This mode displays the current Debugger settings. You can change the settings by selecting or deselecting various options. For further information, refer to Settings and Warnings

Other Display Modes

You can access other display modes by choosing Goto ® Display data object.

Single field

Displays the contents and technical attributes of a field.

Structured

field

Displays the components of a structure, along with their contents and attributes. If you double-click a component, the system displays detailed information for it.

Strings

Display the content and current length of the string. You can also display part of the content by means of offset and length.

Internal table

Displays the type, line numbers and contents of an internal table.

Object

Displays the structure of an ABAP Object.

For further information on these displays, refer to Displaying Attributes and Displaying ABAP Objects

Checking System Programs for Errors

To check a program or program component that is part of the ABAP Workbench (for example, the Screen Painter), you must use the system Debugger. To start the system Debugger, choose System ® Utilities ® Debug System from any screen. To stop the system Debugger, choose Debugger ® Debugging off.

Displaying Program Attributes

You can display the attributes Fixed Point Arithmetic, System Program, and Unicode Checks of the program that has just been executed by choosing Goto ® Further Information ® Program Attributes.

Restarting the Debugger

If you choose Debugging ® Restart, debugging mode is stopped and the system takes you to the initial screen of the last transaction you called. If, for example, you started an ABAP program in debugging mode from transaction SE38 (ABAP Editor), choosing Debugging ® Restart will take you back to the screen titled ABAP Editor: Initial Screen. If you want to restart the program in debugging mode, choose Debugging.

Breakpoints

Apart from direct execution of an ABAP program in the Debugger, it is also possible to start the Debugger call by the exact setting of a breakpoint. This is achieved by setting one or more of these breakpoints in the program. A breakpoint is a signal at a particular point in the program that tells the ABAP runtime processor to interrupt processing and start the Debugger. The program runs normally until the breakpoint is reached.

There is also a special kind of breakpoint called a watchpoint. When you use watchpoints, the Debugger is not activated until the contents of a particular field change. For further information, refer to Watchpoints.

Breakpoint Variants

The Debugger contains different breakpoint variants:

Static

The BREAK-POINT statement in an ABAP program. Static breakpoints are not normally user-specific. However, you can make them user-specific.

Directly-set

dynamic breakpoints

Can be set in the ABAP Editor or the Debugger. Dynamic breakpoints are always user-specific, and are deleted when you log off from the R/3 System.

Breakpoints

at statement

The Debugger stops the program directly before the specified statement is executed.

Breakpoints

at subroutine

The Debugger stops the program directly before the specified subroutine is called.

Breakpoint at function module

The Debugger stops the program directly before the specified function module is called.

Breakpoint at method

The Debugger stops the program directly before the specified method is called.

Breakpoints at system exceptions

The Debugger stops the program directly after a system exception, that is, after a runtime error has been intercepted.

Static Breakpoints

Static breakpoints are not normally user-specific. Once a user has inserted the statement BREAK-POINT or BREAK name in an ABAP program, the system always interrupts the program at that point for that user or only for the user name. This procedure is only useful in the development phase of an application, when the program execution is always to be interrupted at the same place. For further information, refer to Static Breakpoints.

In HTTP sessions, a static breakpoint is skipped if you did not set additional dynamic HTTP breakpoints in the editor of a BSP page. Instead, a corresponding system log entry is written, which can be checked using transaction SM21.

Dynamic Breakpoints

Dynamic breakpoints are user-specific. Therefore, you should use them if you only want the program to be interrupted when you run it yourself, not when it is being executed by other users. All dynamic breakpoints are deleted when you log off from the R/3 System.

Dynamic breakpoints are more flexible than static breakpoints, because you can deactivate or delete them at runtime. They have the following advantages:

You do not have to change the program code

You can set them even when the program is locked by another programmer

You can define a counter that only activates the breakpoint after it has been reached

Special dynamic breakpoints are useful when you want to interrupt a program directly before a particular ABAP statement, a subroutine, or an event, but do not know exactly where to find it in the source code. Event here is used to refer to the occurrence of a particular statement, for example, or calling up a method. Special dynamic breakpoints are user-specific. You can only set them in the Debugger. For further information, refer to Dynamic Breakpoints.

In HTTP sessions, the system stops both at static and dynamic breakpoints if a dynamic breakpoint was set in the editor of a BSP page before program execution.

Lifetime and Transfer of Breakpoints

A static breakpoint remains intact as long as the BREAK-POINT or BREAK-POINT name statement is not removed from the source code. Without saving, dynamic breakpoints only remain intact in the relevant internal session. However, they are effective during the entire user session, if they are saved by choosing Breakpoints ® Save in the ABAP Debugger. For more details on the subject of sessions and user sessions, refer to Modularization Techniques in the ABAP keyword documentation.

If you call an HTTP session during a user session, only the HTTP breakpoints are loaded when the HTTP session is started. You activate HTTP debugging in the ABAP Editor by choosing Utilities ® Settings ® HTTP Debugging. Depending on the setting, the system then displays either the HTTP or standard breakpoints in the Editor.

If you call an update session during a user session, breakpoints that were defined beforehand in the calling processing unit are copied to the new update session, where they can be displayed under Breakpoints. If, in the ABAP Debugger, you check Update Debugging under Settings and then, for example, call the update module func using CALL FUNCTION func IN UPDATE TASK, a new window is opened in which you can debug this function module in the update session. All the breakpoints that were set in the calling processing unit can also be processed here.

Breakpoints at Statements

You can use this special kind of dynamic breakpoint to interrupt a program directly before an ABAP statement is processed.

Prerequisites

You must already be running the program in the Debugger.

Procedure

To set a breakpoint at an ABAP statement:

1.Choose Breakpoint ® Breakpoint at ® Statement...

The following dialog box appears:

2.Enter the ABAP statement.

The system sets a breakpoint at all points in the program at which the ABAP statement occurs.

3.Choose ENTER.

The breakpoint applies to all lines containing the specified statement.

Result

The system confirms the breakpoint and adds it to the list in the display. When you finish your debugging session, the breakpoint is automatically deleted unless you have explicitly saved it.

Breakpoints at Subroutines

You can use this special kind of dynamic breakpoint to interrupt a program directly before a subroutine is called.

Prerequisites

You must already be running the program in the Debugger.

Procedure

To set a breakpoint for a subroutine:

Choose Breakpoint ® Breakpoint at ® Event/Subroutine.

The following dialog box then appears:

Enter the name of the subroutine before which you want to interrupt the program. By default, the Program field contains the name of the program that is currently active. The system sets a breakpoint wherever the specified subroutine occurs in the program code.

Choose ENTER.

Result

The system confirms the breakpoint. The breakpoint is added to the breakpoints displayed.

Breakpoints at Function Module

You can use this kind of dynamic breakpoint to interrupt a program directly before a function module is called.

Prerequisites

You must already be running the program in the Debugger.

Procedure

To set a breakpoint for a function module:

Choose Breakpoint ® Breakpoint at ® Function module...

The following dialog box appears:

Enter the name of the function module before which you want to interrupt the program. The system sets a breakpoint wherever the specified event, module pool, or subroutine occurs in the program code.

Choose ENTER.

Result

If you entered a valid function module name, the system confirms that the breakpoint has been set. If the function module exists in the system, the new breakpoint is added to the display list.

Breakpoints at Methods

You can use this special kind of dynamic breakpoint to interrupt a program directly before a method is called.

Prerequisites

You must be already running the program in the debugger.

Procedure

To set a breakpoint for methods:

...

1. Choose Breakpoint ® Breakpoint at ® Method...

The following dialog box then appears:

2. Enter the name of the method and class before which you want to interrupt the program. A breakpoint is then set each time the specified processing block appears in the source code.

3. Choose ENTER.

Result

The system confirms the breakpoint. The breakpoint is added to the list in the display.

Breakpoints at System Exceptions

You can use this special form of dynamic breakpoint to interrupt a program immediately after a runtime error has occurred.

Prerequisites

You must already be running the program in the Debugger.

Procedure

To set a breakpoint at a system exception:

Choose Breakpoint ® Breakpoint at ® System exception.

Result

The system confirms the breakpoint. The breakpoint is added to the breakpoints displayed.

When a system exception is triggered, a warning triangle appears in the line containing the statement that caused it. If you double-click the warning triangle, the internal name of the runtime error appears.

Static Breakpoints

You should only use static breakpoints during the development phase of an application. You must remove them from your program before you transport it.

Setting Breakpoints

To set a static breakpoint, use the ABAP statement BREAK-POINT . Place the breakpoint in the line at which you want to interrupt the program.

program RSDEBUG_01.

....

if SY-SUBRC 0.

break-point.

endif.

....

When you run the program, the runtime processor interrupts it when the breakpoints occur. You can number your breakpoints to make them easier to identify ( BREAK-POINT 1, BREAK-POINT 2 …).

Static breakpoints are not normally user-specific. The program is, therefore, always interrupted as soon as the runtime processor reaches the line containing the breakpoint. The program is interrupted regardless of the user who executes it.

However, you can set user-specific static breakpoints using the BREAK statement followed by your user name. For example, if you use the statement BREAK SMITH , the program is only interrupted when user Smith runs it. Although user-specific breakpoints appear in the program code, they are not active when other users run the program. You should, however, be careful if an application is being used by several users with the same name.

Deleting Breakpoints

Since static breakpoints apply to all users, you must remove them from the program once you have finished testing it. In the ABAP Editor, you can find breakpoints quickly by choosing Utilities ® Global search. You can also use the Extended Program Check to find them.

If you do not remove static breakpoints from your program, they will be transported to your production system. This could cause serious problems in the production system.

Dynamic Breakpoints

You can set up to 30 dynamic breakpoints without changing the program code. Dynamic breakpoints can be set either in the ABAP Editor or directly in the Debugger.

Setting Dynamic Breakpoints in the ABAP Editor

You can set dynamic breakpoints in the ABAP Editor regardless of whether you are in display or change mode. You can also set breakpoints directly from within the Debugger at runtime. To set a dynamic breakpoint in the ABAP Editor:

Position the cursor on the line of the source code at which you want to set the breakpoint.

Choose Utilities ® Breakpoints ® Set or the Stop icon. The system confirms that the breakpoint has been set.

To display a list of all dynamic breakpoints in a program, choose Utilities ® Breakpoints ® Display. You can use this list to navigate to a particular breakpoint or to delete one or more breakpoints from the program.

Setting Dynamic Breakpoints in Debugging Mode

To set a dynamic breakpoint in the Debugger:

Position the cursor on the line in which you want to set the breakpoint.

Select the line by double-clicking it or choosing Breakpoint ® Set/delete.

The system sets the breakpoint, and displays a small stop sign to the left of the relevant line. If the line already contained a breakpoint, it is deleted.

When you finish your debugging session, the breakpoint is automatically deleted unless you have explicitly saved it.

Saving Breakpoints

If you want to leave the Debugger temporarily, you can save your dynamic breakpoints so that they are still active when you return to the Debugger within the same terminal session.

To save the breakpoints that you have set in the Debugger:

Choose Breakpoint ® Save.

The system saves all of the breakpoints that you have set in the current program. These breakpoints will remain active until you either explicitly delete them or log off from the system.

You can also delete breakpoints that you have saved:

By deleting individual breakpoints from the display and then saving again. In this case, only your selected breakpoints will be deleted.

By choosing Breakpoint ® Delete all. In this case, the system deletes all dynamic breakpoints.

Managing Dynamic Breakpoints

The ABAP Debugger provides a convenient user interface for managing breakpoints. To open the breakpoint display, choose Breakpoints, or, from the menu, Goto ® Control debugging ® Breakpoints.

Example

Functions

This display mode contains the following functions for breakpoints:

Breakpoint Display

The scrollable breakpoint display contains up to 30 dynamic breakpoints. For breakpoints that you set directly, the program name and line number at which the breakpoint occurs are displayed. For special breakpoint forms, the list displays the statements, events, subroutines, and module calls at which the relevant breakpoints are set.

Counter

In the breakpoint display, you can specify a counter. When you use a counter, the breakpoint is not activated until it has been reached a specified number of times. For example, if you enter 5 for the counter, the breakpoint is not activated until it is reached for the fifth time. After the breakpoint has been activated, it remains so, and the counter no longer appears in the breakpoint display.

Deleting Breakpoints

Position the cursor on the breakpoint that you want to delete, and either double-click the line or choose Breakpoint ® Set/delete. To delete all breakpoints, choose Breakpoint ® Delete all.

Activating and Deactivating Breakpoints

Position the cursor on the breakpoint that you want to activate or deactivate and choose Breakpoint ® Activate/deactivate.

Regards

Sailaja.

Former Member
0 Kudos

Hi,

for setting break-points.

Just go to se38 (to your program). After that,

Utilities>Break-points>now choose for setting or deleting break-points.

Note: before following the above keep your cursor where you are going to set or delete break-point.

Advantage of this break-points:

This will help you to understand the flow(the perticular place where you want to check for data in the debugging mode and for finding errors) of the program when the break-point is set and pressed 'F8'.

Former Member
0 Kudos

hi srinivasan,

Breakpoints

Apart from being able to execute an ABAP program in the Debugger, you can also start the Debugger call by the choosing a breakpoint. This is achieved by setting one or more of these breakpoints in the program. A breakpoint is a signal at a particular point in the program that tells the ABAP runtime processor to interrupt processing and start the Debugger. The Debugger is activated when the program reaches this point.

There is also a special kind of breakpoint called a watchpoint. When you use watchpoints, the Debugger is not activated until the contents of a particular field change. For more information, refer to the chapter Watchpoints.

Breakpoint Variants

The Debugger contains different breakpoint variants:

Static

A user-specific breakpoint is inserted in the source code as an ABAP statement using the keyword BREAK-POINT. A non user-specific breakpoint is set in the ABAP Editor using the BREAK user name statement.

Directly set

dynamic breakpoints

Can be set in the ABAP Editor or the Debugger by double-clicking a line, for example. Dynamic breakpoints are always user-specific, and are deleted when you log off from the R/3 System.

Breakpoints

at statements

The Debugger stops the program immediately before the specified statement is executed.

Breakpoints

at subroutines

The Debugger stops the program immediately before the specified subroutine is called.

Breakpoints at function modules

The Debugger stops the program immediately before the specified function module is called.

Breakpoints at methods

The Debugger stops the program immediately before the specified method is called.

Breakpoints at exceptions and system exceptions

The Debugger stops the program immediately after a system exception, that is, after a runtime error has been intercepted.

Static Breakpoints

Static breakpoints are always user-independent if there is no specification of a user name. Once a user has inserted the statement BREAK-POINT or BREAK name in an ABAP program, the system always interrupts the program at that point for that user or only for the user name. This procedure is only useful in the development phase of an application when program execution is always to be interrupted at the same place. For more information, refer to the chapter Static Breakpoints.

In HTTP sessions, a static breakpoint is skipped if you did not set additional dynamic HTTP breakpoints in the editor of a BSP page. Instead, a corresponding system log entry is written, which can be checked using transaction SM21.

Dynamic Breakpoints

Dynamic breakpoints are user-specific. Therefore, you should use them if you only want the program to be interrupted when you run it yourself, not when it is being executed by other users. All dynamic breakpoints are deleted when you log off from the R/3 System.

Dynamic breakpoints are more flexible than static breakpoints because you can deactivate or delete them at runtime. They have the following advantages:

· You do not have to change the program code.

· You can set them even when the program is locked by another programmer.

· You can define a counter that only activates the breakpoint after it has been reached.

Special dynamic breakpoints are useful when you want to interrupt a program directly before a particular ABAP statement, a subroutine, or an event, but do not know exactly where to find it in the source code. Event here is used to refer to the occurrence of a particular statement, for example, or calling up a method. Special dynamic breakpoints are user-specific. You can only set them in the Debugger. For more information, refer to the chapter Dynamic Breakpoints.

In HTTP sessions, the system stops both at static and dynamic breakpoints if a dynamic breakpoint was set in the editor of a BSP page before program execution.

Lifetime and Transfer of Breakpoints

A static breakpoint remains intact as long as the BREAK-POINT or BREAK-POINT name statement is not removed from the source code. Without saving, dynamic breakpoints only remain intact in the relevant internal session. However, they remain in effect during the entire user session if they are saved by choosing the menu path Breakpoints ® Save in the ABAP Debugger. For more details on the subject of user sessions and modes, refer to Modularization Techniques in the ABAP keyword documentation.

If you call an HTTP session during a user session, only the HTTP breakpoints are loaded when the HTTP session is started. You activate HTTP debugging in the ABAP Editor by choosing Utilities ® Settings ® HTTP Debugging. Depending on the setting, the system then displays either the HTTP or standard breakpoints in the Editor.

If you call an update session during a user session, breakpoints that were defined beforehand in the calling processing unit are copied to the new update session, where they can be displayed under Breakpoints. If, in the ABAP Debugger, you check Update Debugging under Settings and then, for example, call the update module func using CALL FUNCTION func IN UPDATE TASK, a new window is opened in which you can debug this function module in the update session. All the breakpoints that were set in the calling processing unit can also be processed here.

boldBreakpoint Types

When you set a breakpoint in the Debugger, it is created as a debugger breakpoint by default. A debugger breakpoint is only valid while the Debugger instance, in which it was set, is active. When the Debugger is closed, all debugger breakpoints set in it are deleted.

If you set a breakpoint in the ABAP Editor, for example, this breakpoint is a session breakpoint. Session breakpoints remain active independently of the existence of a Debugger and are valid for all external sessions of a logon. Within the Debugger, you can convert a debugger breakpoint into a session breakpoint and vice versa.

If the setting Session Breakpoints Active Immediately is checked (via Utilities ® Settings ® ABAP Editor ® Debugging in the ABAP Editor or Object Navigator), you can set a session breakpoint in an external session of a logon to force a running program into the Debugger that runs in the same logon (for example, in an external session) and will process the point at which the session breakpoint was set.

User breakpoints (previously known as external breakpoints) are valid for all user logons on the current server of the current system. User breakpoints are specifically required when debugging BSP or Web Dynpro applications. In these cases, you do not log on using the SAP GUI but via a browser, for example. Therefore, any breakpoints must be set before logging on.

User breakpoints are only valid for a period of 2 hours.

As of Release 7.00, user breakpoints set for BSP or Web Dynpro applications are also valid for SAP GUI logons.

Within the Debugger, you can convert debugger or session breakpoints into user breakpoints and vice versa.

reward if useful

regards,

sravanthi

Former Member
0 Kudos

Hi,

Regarding the break points u can check this material u will get the idea about the break points.

help.sap.com/saphelp_nw70/helpdata/en/c6/617cbee68c11d2b2ab080009b43351/content.htm

Break point is the signal which is specified in the program tells the system to stop the program execution and start the debugger . types of break piints availabe with abap are:

Static: they are set up with the BREAKPOINT keyword inside the program which u can directly display with the abap source code editor.

Dynamic: This brkpoint is not visible in the code . Position the cursor over the source code line to hav the break point and select utilities->break point->set. U can delete them or display them frm break point list.

Watch PointsL are field specific . The Program is stopped when the field reaches the value specified in the watch point. Execute the program in debugging mode.

Regards,

Sana.

Reward points if found useful..

Former Member
0 Kudos

Hi Srinu,

see there are two types of break points are there

1.static break point

2.dynamic break point.

static break point: if you use to code as breakpoint from where you have to

debugg this is called static break point.(physical notaion of break point)

suppose if you create a break point and if any another user runs the same

program or transaction the break point will set and the performance become

down..

dynamic break point: if you select the statement from where you have to debug

and select stop icon on the application tool bar this is known as dynamic

break point.This will set for 2 min and will remove automatically. and one

more thing is this is user specified.so if the same transactions or progarm

will run by other user this break point will not set.

reward if useful...

thanks and regards,

swami

Former Member
0 Kudos

Hi

breakpints are of 2 types

1.static:

hard code of statement BREAK-PIOINT in your program and then execute program.( the program will go to debuging everytime you execute the program.)

2.Dynamic:

a. in SE38, after entring the program name in the command field type /h an press enter. then click on execute

b. place the cursor at a line in program and press CtrlShiftF12 or click on break point button.

External Breakpoints:

Dynamic break-points are external break-points.

Session Breakpoints:

you can put break-points even while debugging. just double clik on statement.( if you double click again that break-point will be deleted)

Ex.While debugging,If you want to come out directly from a loop, just place your cursor on ENDLOOP statement and double click there.and then press F8. now you will be out from the loop.

After execution of your program you can find external breakpoints but not Session breakpoints.

Regards,

Jay